INDIAN ENGINEERING DESIGN FORUM

Connect. Collaborate. Innovate.
16
October
2017

The Role of Data Scientists, for Today and Tomorrow

A Perspective

The Role of Data Scientists, for Today and Tomorrow

What we commonly label as "disruptive" is often the result of breaking the status quo. Disruptions seem to have their cycles and a few important ones come to my mind. In 1800s, we invented steam engines, cracked the math of thermodynamics, giving way to a number of derived industries: factories, locomotives, mills, etc. The lifecycle of this innovation reached its destiny sixty years later with the first ever depression. People could have been smarter and learned their lesson. But they became smarter by inventing Electricity and Magnetism just eight decades later (1880s) than the invention of steam engines. That disrupted status quo and rapid electrification took place across the world. Another eight decades later (1960s) we got transistors, computers and the beginnings of the internet. Six decades since then (2020s), we are in the cusp of another cycle. The sure candidate for next disruption is AI along with bio/nano technology.

I notice a pattern here. All disruptions happen when the previous one is mastered, done and dusted. Today we are within arms length of reaching the limits of Moore’s Law. The situation is primed for the next disruption. Amidst the evolution on doubling computing power every year and a half, the silent winner has been an exponential increase of data over the same period. Every computerized establishment saved cost, did more of the same (old) business in the same business year. Well, we homo sapiens, are too smart to run same (old) businesses. We leveraged data for intelligence and built new markets, new products and new strategies. In the last 2-3 decades of the recent technological cycle, we have progressed enough on big data technologies to enable the next disruption.

11
October
2017

Making Art From Google Maps

The Earth from Above

Making Art From Google Maps

Earlier today I looked up some location in Bangalore via Google Maps. One thing led to another and I ended up spending the entire morning exploring beautiful Earth via Google Maps. Most often we use Google Maps for locations and directions. We use it for intra-city navigation and occasionally for those weekend trips when we venture farther from our daily routines. Apart from these, it's interesting to note that Google Maps can be a useful tool to discover the beauty of our planet.

It's not that I'm somehow a pioneer in discovering the artistic merit in Google Maps. Postcards from Google Earth, Street View Stereographic, Jenny Odell's Satellite Collections, Florian Freier's Cached Landscapes, David Hanaurer's WorldWide Carpets and Shaun Utter's Random Google Maps are just some examples of artists getting inspired by Google Maps. In almost all of these examples, the focus has been on urban landscapes. The artists don't present Google Maps as they are. Being artists, they transform the images into something surreal; they assemble collages; they saturate the colours or accentuate the patterns. In the process, they leave their signature as artists in what they create. What I created today is different.

4
October
2017

Engineers, Think Products!

Practical guidelines to Indian engineers

Engineers, Think Products!

Many engineers in India are working side by side with engineers from other parts of the world as part of global design teams. Yet even the simplest of electronics that we see around us has little or no connection with India. Why is it that a country that produces top engineering talent good enough to work with the best in the world looks like just a consumer, rather than a partner, in this global industry? Why do we not see a large number of electronics products that are ‘made in India’ or ‘designed in India’?

Obviously, there is no single or simple answer. Undoubtedly, several other countries have done a lot more to promote their industries. However, in this article I stay away from the policy aspects and approach this question from a purely engineering viewpoint. I take a candid inside look at the engineering community itself and explore where I think some of the missing pieces may be. I do not have any magic recipe for success, but I do make some suggestions based on my experience and introspection.

27
September
2017

Edge Computing in a Telecom Network

Powered by Multi-access Edge Computing (MEC)

Edge Computing in a Telecom Network

Until a few years ago, for many decades, telecom operators had been claiming that all they provided was a "dumb pipe". It was not their concern what those pipes carried; and they were not responsible for content that was served or consumed at both ends of the pipe. Their main goal was to ensure that the pipes had enough bandwidth to serve average and peak traffic requirements. All was well and good until over-the-top (OTT) content starting dominating the market. Such content bypassed legacy circuit-switched services and value-added services provided by the operators.

Indeed telecom operators started to lose both ends of the bargain. They now wanted control over the content and charge a premium but all they could collect from their customers was for bare bits and bytes. In a price-sensitive market, "unlimited plans" became the order of the day. When OTT content became predominant, operator revenues started to drop. Content also became rich in multimedia, particularly video that congested backhaul links. Operators couldn't afford to upgrade these backhauls. Yes, operators were providing dumb pipes but apparently even these had a hard time keeping up with demand.

16
September
2017

SoC industry dynamics beyond the smartphone era

Industry analysis and opinion

SoC industry dynamics beyond the smartphone era

Smartphones play a vital role in our life; it is sort of panacea for us. It has achieved massive growth in the last decade. With such demand of the end product, it is obvious that the supply side has worked in overdrive. Semiconductor industry has seen massive growth due to smartphones. The number of OEMs increased to fulfil the volume demands, pulling more vendors into semiconductor industry to suffice the OEMs’ supply chain requirements.

A few OEMs made fortune in smartphone sales, with revenue exceeding billions cumulatively. Such capital inflow encouraged them to invest more money on product development, to fulfil the end users’ paradoxical requirement of more performance with more battery life (less power consumption) at a lower price. With cumulative silicon sales going into billions, the semiconductor industry responded positively, and focused on stretching the innovation into leading process nodes and other techniques to enhance performance.

31
August
2017

Here's What To Do To Build A Successful Mobile App

Learnings from Mobile Growth Bangalore Meetup

Here's What To Do To Build A Successful Mobile App

If you're a beginner to the world of mobile apps, you may be looking for someone to guide you. Developing an app and getting it out on the app store is only the start of a long journey. Many questions will hound you from the start. Why are so few users downloading my app? Why do many users stop using the app within a few days? Why are users not making purchases via the app? Why are users not using the app as often as expected?

Obviously, all these questions cannot be investigated at the same time. Where exactly should you focus your efforts and budget? How should the issues be prioritized? Is it a matter for developers, digital marketeers, product managers or customer support staff? Wouldn't it be nice if there's a community of mobile developers to share and exchange best practices? That's exactly what Mobile Growth provides.

23
August
2017

When Machines Begin To Talk

An opinion

When Machines Begin To Talk

If there's one thing that's unique about being human, we can't deny that it's speech. Sure, animals have a way of communicating but that's not in any way as refined as we humans do. The key lies in the way we are able modulate sound waves with the rolls and wags of our tongue. Perhaps, it's for this reason we have phrases such as "mother tongue". Aural communication in the rest of the animal kingdom is limited to coarse sounds that we simply name as moos, grunts and hee-haws. But it's not going to be long before we lose our monopoly of speech.

The best machines could do in the past were beeps and alarms. Those of us who have lived through the times of early fixed line modems can recall the staccato of beeps as they tried to handshake and establish a connection to a server somewhere on the internet. Of course, machines also talk among themselves silently, by parsing bits and bytes. But now the time has come for machines to talk directly to humans via human speech.

14
August
2017

The Manual of Technical Communication

Book Review

The Manual of Technical Communication

Authors: Students of University of Alabama in Huntsville
Publisher: UAH Business and Technical Writing Program, 2014

There's one aspect of being an engineer that's often overlooked by engineers. Engineers focus on solving problems, building systems, writing code, designing models, and so on. They enjoy this sort of work but what they don't enjoy is to communicate. Perhaps this is because they lack the essential skills to do this right. Most university degrees in engineering include at least one module on technical communication but students take this module out of necessity rather than motivation. It's important for young engineers and students alike to realize that technical communication is the "x-factor" that could make them stand out from the crowd. This book written and edited by students at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is a practical guide and a good starting point for all engineers.

Why is technical communication so important? An engineer's work cannot see the light of day unless she can explain her design decisions to her peers; or rationalize the budget and cost considerations of a project; or describe clearly the idea that's in her mind; or convince her boss why something needs to be done differently; or make a presentation to potential clients; or write an email that summarizes what was discussed at a lunch meeting. If as engineers we are unable to put across our ideas clearly, we will probably not reach our full potential and put to risk the projects we work on and our careers in the process.

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